Sunday, February 5, 2012

A hardy annual: the obligatory garden-in-the-snow picture

Thanks to Benjamin Vogt, I was recalling the other day that the first time my son saw snow was when he was three years old. We were touring around the south-western USA, and we'd pitched up in Cedar City, Utah just as it started to snow.
Rory, who's now 21, was fascinated and stood in the middle of the street trying to catch snowflakes on his tongue. We were desperate to get into a nice warm restaurant and have a hot meal. He just wanted to eat ice crystals.
In those days, we didn't get snow in London that often. Indeed, only about five years ago, I got rid of our sledge because we never used it - it just hung in the garage gathering dust. Now we get snow every year.
It's always important to make the distinction between a weather event (such as a heatwave, or a snowstorm), and a climatic trend. But it does seem as if our climate really is changing - bearing out this report in The Independent yesterday.
I'm fond of saying I hate snow - I hate the disruption it causes, and the fact that everyone else seems to be able to take the day off while we journalists have to scramble into work somehow. Like the Pony Express, we always get through.
But secretly, I love it - I love that telltale white light after a night of snow, and the peace and quiet that seems to descend on the city.
Anyway, here's the picture of the garden.

12 comments:

petoskystone said...

A lovely picture it is. The Connecticut Valley doesn't have a flake of snow this February :(

Nigel Summerley said...

Yes, I'll always remember Rory eating his first snow... a magical moment.

Céline said...

Here at botanic bay, it snowed some 10 cm of white fluff - turned to skiddy ice with the temperature ! So I pot around in the house. Come and have a look ! Do you like indoor gardening ?

Alison said...

It is pretty when it first comes down, but unfortunately, it then gets ugly fast! Like you, I dislike the disruption it causes, not to mention the difficulty with driving.

Susan in the Pink hat said...

Snow in London! It seems like it's rarer and rarer. And Cedar City can get a LOT of snow. The only time I've ever pulled off the road for the night because it was snowing too heavily was in Cedar City.

Lucy said...

Hurray for the picture of the garden. Hurray for snow.

(Except we don't have any where I live!)

I did part of my growing up in London. Because I remember one year of deep snow and great long ice-slides in the playground, I've tended to have the impression we had it a lot. But maybe we didn't. Or maybe I've lived through a range of climatic changes and am really ever so, ever so old. (Probably that's it!)

Lancashire rose said...

I'm with you Victoria. Your garden looks very pretty with its winter dusting. I think it snowed once when I was growing up. Everything was at a standstill but they didn't let us take the day off school. Snow really improves the winter garden as does rime. We seldom see it here but it has happened a few times and I am just like a child. Me, who spent 12 years in Montreal. Now that is snow.

Mark and Gaz said...

Snow in the south east in the past 24 hours is the current hot topic amongst gardeners. The west seems to have wholly escaped, getting just rain instead. I would have preferred rain over snow anytime but hey, at least it looks pretty.

And it's only pretty for a shot while. The longer it hangs around the faster its charm goes (for me anyway). Btw, lovely photo, the garden looks lovely with the white dusting :)

Gardeningbren said...

The snow gives the garden a whole different dimension doesn't it. The four season landscape is a good thing, really ;-). Glad you shared secretly liking it as we Canajans kinda take it in stride.

Denise said...

Just read in the online New York Times of record cold temps in Europe, including Rome, then immediately wondered if Victoria has mentioned it in her blog yet -- yes, indeed, and with a wonderful story and photo. What charming synchronicity.

James Golden said...

Talk about climate change ... have you read Doris Lessing's Mara and Dann? It puts our little climatic aberration into a larger perspective.

benton said...

Nice post Lawn .